NEWS

Billmyre, Esher, and Kelliher awarded an Interdisciplinary Colloquia initiative. Blake Billmyre (Heitman Lab), Shannon Esher (Alspaugh Lab), and Tina Kelliher (Haase Lab) received an Interdisciplinary Colloquia initiative for the Eukaryotic Pathogenesis Investigator Club (EPIC). EPIC was established in 2015 with the goal of fostering interactions among scientists studying eukaryotic pathogens at Duke and in the Triangle area. Despite the wide variety of laboratories studying mycology and parasitology at Duke, EPIC is the only seminar series focused broadly on eukaryotic pathogenesis. EPIC meets once monthly and consists of two research talks from faculty and trainees in the group, including members of the Tri-Institutional Molecular Mycology and Pathogenesis Training Program (Tri-I MMPTP). After a successful first year in which over 15 research groups at Duke and UNC-Chapel Hill Universities participated, EPIC applied for and was awarded $5000 from the School of Medicine to sustain and expand the series to include two invited outside speakers.

Aballay featured in Duke Today.  Alejandro Aballay, PhD and his members of his laboratory have shown that manipulating dopamine signaling in the nervous system in C. elegans has a direct impact on inflammation in the gut.  Read more in the newly released publication in Current Biology [Science Direct].  Access the Duke Today article here.

Yibin Kang, MGM Graduate Student alum, Cullen Lab, inducted into the Inaugural Class of Few-Glasson Society.  Yibin Kang, PhD, Professor of Molecular Biology at Princeton University is among three distinguished alumni  inducted into the Inaugural Class of the Duke Graduate School Few-Glasson Alumni Society.  Yibin is a former graduate student of Bryan Cullen’s laboratory and is currently a professor at Princeton University.  More…

Rawls awarded an Interdisciplinary Colloquia initiative. John Rawls received an Interdisciplinary Colloquia Initiative for the upcoming Duke Zebrafish Research Symposia. The Duke Zebrafish Research Symposia bring together basic science, transnational and clinical scientists from across the Duke campus utilizing the zebrafish to model diverse aspects of human health and disease. Supported programs include weekly research-in-progress meetings, an annual research symposium, and an annual principal investigator summit.  Dr. Rawls was awarded $5000 for a one year period to fund the symposia.

Johnathan Bethke awarded an appointment in IBIEM program.  Johnathan Bethke was awarded an appointment in the Integrative Bioinformatics for Investigating and Engineering Microbiomes (IBIEM) program led by Claudia Gunsch.  IBIEM is an interdisciplinary graduate training program between Duke University and North Carolina A&T State University which brings together scientists from various fields with an interest in microbiome research.

Abraham and colleagues featured in Duke Medicine news.  Over the past decade, Abraham and colleagues have led many studies analyzing the immune responses to urinary tract infections (UTIs). One area of interest was investigating how bladder epithelial cells combat urothopathogenic E.coli after these cells have been invaded by the pathogen. Their research revealed that bladder epithelial cells actively expelled most of the infecting bacteria without any cell lysis. Recently, they elucidated the underlying mechanism of bacterial export and showed that it involved the transport machinery normally utilized by cells to secrete hormones. This work was published in the journal Immunity.  More…

Martinez awarded 2016 ASM Robert D. Watkins Gradudate Research Fellowship. David Martinez, a graduate student in the Permar lab, has received a prestigious 2016 ASM Robert D. Watkins Graduate Research fellowship. This award given by the American Society of Microbiology (ASM) recognizes the “best and brightest rising scientists” based on the research proposals they submit and on their research excellence. David will investigate the determinants of maternal IgG transplacental transfer to HIV-exposed uninfected infants. The fellowship stipend is $21,000 per year accompanied by a travel award to ASM Microbe, grant writing workshops, and is awarded for up to three years.

A Little Dirt Won’t Hurt:  Lawrence David, John Rawls, Pat Seed, and other Duke microbiome researchers are featured in a Duke Magazine article. Read the article here.

Horner awarded the 2016 Young Investigator Award.  Stacy Horner, PhD, was awarded the 2016 Young Investigator Award from the American Society for Microbiology.  this award is given to recognize and reward early career scientist for research excellence and potential in microbiology and infectious disease. Stacy was one of four awarded this prestigious award.

Coers named a 2016 Burroughs Wellcome Fund Investigator in the Pathogenesis of Infectious Disease.  Dr. Jörn Coers is one of ten recipients of the 2016 Burroughs Wellcome Fund Investigator in the Pathogenesis of Infectious Disease award sharing the ranks with Audrey Odom, MD, PhD, Duke MSTP alum and Nels Edle, PhD, the 2015 invited MGM Retreat Lecturer.  More…

Gartin, awarded the 2016 Edward C. Horn Memorial Prize for Excellence in Biology.  Ashley Gartin, undergraduate research in Dr. David Pickup’s lab received the 2016 Edward C. Horn Memorial Prize for Excellence in Biology on Sunday, May 15, 2016.  This award is given each year to a graduating biology major who has shown the highest level of academic achievement and promise. This prize is in memory of Edward C. Horn.

Steinbach award the top award from the American Federation of Medical Research (AFMR). William Steinbach, MD, professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and professor of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, will receive the American Federation for Medical Research’s (AFMR) highest honor for medical research, the Outstanding Investigator Award.  More…  

Fungal Pathogen sheds gene silencing machinery to become more dangerous Blake Billmyre, a UPGG Graduate Student in the laboratory of Dr. Joseph Heitman, was recently featured in PHYS.ORG, Genomeweb, and Duke Today for his recently published article, “Gene network polymorphism illuminates loss and retention of novel RNAi silencing components in the Cryptococcus pathogenic species complex” in PLOS Genetics.

Heitman awarded the F1000 Faculty Member of the Year Award 2015  Joseph Heitman, MD, PhD, James. B Duke Professor and Chair of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, has received the 2015 F1000 Faculty Member of the Year Award for the Microbiology Faculty. This is the 4th time he was awarded this honor.  He also received the award in 2011, 2013, and 2014. More…

Tomaras selected for 2016 Ruth and A. Morris Williams Faculty Research Prize Georgia Tomaras, PhD Professor in Surgery, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, has been selected to receive the 2016 Ruth and A. Morris Williams Faculty Research Prize.  Tomaras is being honored for her outstanding contributions in clinical science research.  More…

Alspaugh selected for 2016 Gordon G. Hammes Faculty Teaching Award Andrew Alspaugh, MD, Professor of Infectious Diseases and Professor of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, has been selected to receive the 2016 Gordon G. Hammes Faculty Teaching Award.  Alspaugh is being honored for his continuing excellence in teaching and mentoring and for his exemplary commitment to the education of graduate students. More…

Steinbach, Alspaugh, and Wormley elected to Fellowship in the American Academy of Microbiology (AAM) William J. Steinbach, MD, professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and professor of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Andrew Alspaugh, MD, professor of Infectious Diseases and professor of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology and, Floyd Wormley, PhD, alumni of John Perfect’s lab and CHoMI were elected to Fellowship in the American Academy of Microbiology. The Academy recognizes excellence, originality, and leadership in the microbiological sciences. More…

The McGinnis Lecture Committee is very excited to announce that Dr. Bonnie Bassler will be giving the 38th annual Jim McGinnis Memorial Lecture on Thursday 3/17/16 at 4:00pm in 103 Bryan Research. More…

Keisha Findley, PhD, MGM graduate student alumnus visited Duke on Saturday, February 13th as an invited guest speaker at the 3rd  Annual Ida Stephens Owens Black Tie dinner presented by Duke University’s Bouchet Society. The Duke University Bouchet Society primarily supports underrepresented minority graduate students in the pursuit of scholarly excellence in the natural sciences, technology, engineering and math.  More…

The Duke Medical Alumni Association awarded Audrey Odom, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Molecular Microbiology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, an alumnus from Dr. Joseph Heitman’s lab and graduate of the Duke MSTP program, the 2016 Emerging Leader Award. A special awards dinner will be held during the Medical Alumni Weekend festivities. Audrey was recently asked to give a Ted Talk on Fighting drug resistant infections with your breath, which can be viewed here.

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases recently awarded Sarah Jaslow a Fellowship Award (F31) for her project, “Characterization of a novel Salmonella regulator of IL-10 production and it’s role in pathogenesis.” Sarah is an MGM Graduate Student in Dennis Ko’s lab where she focuses her research on Host-Pathogen interactions, genetics, and translational medicine.

Nutrient Deprivation kills kidney cancer. Jen-Tsan Ashley Chi’s research was recently featured in a Duke Today article.  The Chi lab discovered a promising target for renal cell carcinomas. To read more about the article in Duke Today, click here.

Drug shows promise for controlling Epstein-Barr Virus. Drug shows promise for controlling Epstein-Barr Virus. Micah Luftig’s laboratory recently published a paper in PNAS finding that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) uses autophagy as a means to compensate for metabolic stress to transform primary human B cells. The paper was featured in Duke Today. Click here to read the published article.

Slow Stem Cell Division May Cause Small Brains.  Published online on January 6 in the journal Neuron, Debby Silver and team figured out how microcephaly produces a much small brain than normal.  The article is featured in several sources including Medical Express and Duke Today.  Click here to read the published article.

The Calcineurin Symposium is scheduled for January 20, 2016 sponsored by the Tri-Institutional Molecular Mycology and Pathogenesis Training Program and the Duke Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology. The talks will be held in 143 Jones Building and lunch will be held in MSRB001.  More…

2015

Beth Sullivan named AAAS Fellow.  The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) named seven Duke Faculty as fellows in recognition of their contributions to innovation, education, and scientific leadership..  The story was featured on the GSA website, AAAS website, Duke School of Medicine website, and on Duke Today.

Hal Bogerd was awarded the Research Staff Appreciation Award in Basic Science by the School of Medicine.  Hal has been a key part of the foundation of MGM, and his partnerships with Bryan extremely successful.  Congratulations on winning such a prestigious award. More…

Alejandro Aballay was featured in a Duke Today news article on infertility worms resisting infection-induced neurodegeneration.  To read the full article, click here.

Rawls and David among the first to receive MEDx funding.  John Rawls, PhD and Lawrence David, PhD along with Claudia Gunsch, PhD received funding from MEDx their upcoming colloquia, “Microbiome Synthesis”.  More…

Heaton receives prestigious Whitehead Scholarship.  Nicholas Heaton, PhD, an assistant professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, has received a three-year Whitehead Scholarship from the Duke School of Medicine. This highly prestigious award will provide stipend support for Heaton while working on his current research. More…

One step closer to a vaccine for cytomegalovirus: Monkeys transmit CMV the same way as humans.  Researchers, Sallie Permar, MD, PhD and Amitinder Kaur, MD now have a powerful new model for working on a vaccine for cytomegalovirus, or CMV, which is the leading infectious cause of birth defects worldwide.  More…

Joseph Heitman has received a Visiting International Professor grant from the University of Ruhr in Bochum Germany.  Dr. Heitman will spend several weeks over the next several years on working visits to collaborate, present research, and participate in graduate education.  His professorship nomination was sponsored by Ulrich Kück.  Visiting International Professor Grants are awarded only to researchers with outstanding scientific record and high international visibility to enable excellent international scientists to establish a sustainable research cooperation with Ruhr University Bochum while at the same time contributing to doctoral supervision and graduate education.

Molecular ‘Kiss Of Death’ flags pathogens for destruction.   Jörn Coers, senior author of a recent study discovering that our bodies mark pathogen-containing vacuoles for destruction by using a molecule called ubiquitin, commonly known as the “kiss of death”, was featured in a Duke Today article and on Science360 News.  More…

NSF awards $15 million to crack the olfactory code.  Hiroaki Matsunami was recently awarded an NSF grant to study the sense of smell.  Hiro is the Principle Investigator of the project titled: “Analysis of the mammalian olfactory code.” This project will investigate the process of odor recognition, focusing on how basic features of odor perception–odor identity and valence, which is the behavioral significance attached to an odor–are encoded in the brain. More…

Specific Fatty Acids May Worsen Crohn’s Disease.  Some research has suggested that omega-3 fatty acids, abundant in fish oils, can relieve inflammation in Crohn’s disease.  But a new study using software developed by Duke scientists hints that we should be paying closer attention to what the other omegas — namely, omega-6 and omega-7 — are doing to improve or worsen the disease.  More…

Duke researchers at the forefront of the field of immunotherapy are working toward applying a modified poliovirus to treat prostate and eventually breast cancer.  Dr. Matthias Gromeier, associate professor of neurosurgery at Duke, was the first to propose using poliovirus to destroy malignant tumors.  More…

The Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) Medical Honor Society announced the 2015 new members, among them is Dr. William Steinbach, Professor of Pediatrics, Co-Director, Tri-Institutional Molecular Mycology and Pathogenesis Training Program.  Membership in AOA is a distinction that accompanies a physician throughout his or her career.  More…

Nicholas Heaton, PhD, joined the Duke University School of Medicine, Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology as an assistant professor in August 2015.  Nick’s current research is focused on Genetic engineering of influenza viruses to study viral pathogenesis.  More…

Lawrence David, PhD, Assistant Professor, has received a Beckman Young Investigator award from the The Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation.  The Beckman Young Investigator Program provides research support to “the most promising young faculty members in the early stages of academic careers in the chemical and life sciences,” according to the program guidelines. In particular, the award funds invention of “methods, instruments and materials that will open up new avenues of research in science.” Lawrence will receive a grant of $750,000 to support his research, “Using natural bacterial interactions to control microbial communities.”  To view a list of the 8 awardees, please click here.

Duke Medicine researchers have found that bladder cells have a highly effective way to combat E. coli bacteria that cause urinary tract infections (UTIs) [Miao et al., 2015].  In a study published online May 28, 2015, in the journal Cell, Duke researchers and their colleagues describe how bladder cells can physically eject the UTI-causing bacteria that manage to invade the host cell. More…

Debby Silver was recently featured in Science for her collaboration with Gregory Wray using mouse models to demonstrate brain development and evolution.  Please click here to view a PDF of the recently published article.

The selection committee has announced the 2015 MGM SURE awardees.  Congratulations to the following undergraduates:  Mawuli Attipoe, Horner Lab; Kimberline Chew, Sullivan Lab; Nick Donadio, Cardenas/Heitman Lab; Vinay Giri, Perfect Lab; Luke Glover, Ko Lab; Quang Nguyen, Permar Lab.  More…

The awards committee of the International Society for Human and Animal Mycology announces the selection of Dr. John Perfect as recipient of The 2015 Lucille K. Georg ISHAM Medal in recognition of his outstanding scientific achievement in the field of medical mycology and infections diseases. Dr. Perfect received the award at the 19th Congress of the International Society for Human and Animal Mycology meeting in Melbourne, Australia, May 4th – 8th, 2015.  More…

The Searle Scholars Program announced the 2015 awardees.  Fifteen young scientists in the chemical and biological sciences have been named 2015 Searle Scholars.  Lawrence David, PhD will be awarded $300,000 in flexible funding to support his work during the next three years. More…

The Hartwell Foundation today officially announced the winners of 2014 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards, which will provide support for three years at $100,000 direct cost per year.  Lawrence David, PhD and MGM Postdoctoral alumni Christina Hull, PhD received 2014 Hartwell Awards. More…

New Gene Influences Apple or Pear Shape, Risk of Future Disease
Scientists have known for some time that people who carry a lot of weight around their bellies are more likely to develop diabetes and heart disease than those who have bigger hips and thighs. But what hasn’t been clear is why fat accumulates in different places to produce these classic “apple” and “pear” shapes. More…

Gromeier, Abbruzzee Receive $300,000 Grant for Translational Pancreatic Cancer Research Matthias Gromeier, MD, and  James Abbruzzese, MD, have just received the 2015 Pancreatic Cancer Action Network Translational Research Grant, a two-year, $300,000 grant that supports translational research toward pancreatic cancer assessment, prevention, or treatment. More…

SEMMA THERAPEUTICS announces $44 Million funding led by MPG Capital to develop Cell Therapy for treating type 1 Diabetes; signs agreement with Global Pharmaceutical company. Semma Therapuetics was co-founded by former Research Assistant Felecia Pagliuca who is now the Director of Technology and Corporate Development.  More…

Searle Scholars Program announced the 2015 awardees.  Fifteen young scientists in the chemical and biological sciences have been named 2015 Searle Scholars. Lawrence David, PhD will be awarded $300,000 in flexible funding to support his or her work during the next three years.
More…

DUKE-UNC collaboration creating “gut-on-a-chip” – Read a featured article about a Duke-UNC collaboration to build a “gut-on-a-chip” to study the microbiome of the human intestines. More…

Evolving a Bigger Brain with Human DNA
Duke scientists have discovered that a crucial DNA difference between humans and chimps boosts brain size in mice.  More …

Chromosome Biology: You’ve Come A Long Way, Baby – Read a featured post from Beth Sullivan, PLOS Genetics Associate Editor, on the last ten years of chromosome biology. More…

MGM Summer Undergraduate Research Engagement (MGM SURE)
The Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology is pleased to announce a 10-week summer fellowship program for Duke undergraduates. The program runs from June 1, 2015 – August 7, 2015.
More …

Cell’s Recycling Team Helps Sound Alarm on Pathogens
Just as households have recycling bins for getting rid of waste, the cell has its own system for cleaning up defunct components.  More …

2014

UPGG Graduate student, Blake Billmyre is awarded a 2015 DeLill Nasser Travel Award
The Genetics Society of America awarded Robert Blake Billmyre a DeLill Nasser Travel Award for Professional Development in Genetics for 2015.  This is one of the most important awards bestowed by GSA because it helps promote the future of their discipline by supporting early career scientists in their own professional development.  More…

Antifungal Drug Development Summit
Please join us for a summit at Duke University January 29-30, 2015 focusing on multi-disciplinary and complementary approaches to anti-fungal therapy development spanning academia and pharma.
More …

Willard Named President and Director of Marine Biological Laboratory
Huntington Willard, an innovative leader in the fields of genetics and genome biology who has built comprehensive research centers at leading institutions, has been appointed the next President and Director of the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.  More …

Drugs to Block Angiogenesis Could Provide New Treatment for TB
Duke researchers’ findings suggest a new therapeutic approach that might target the body’s response to tuberculosis (TB).  More …

Microbiome Researchers Find Common Ground
More than 200 scientists, clinicians, engineers and students gathered at Duke University Medical Center to learn about cutting-edge microbiome research in an interdisciplinary symposium.  More …

Post-Doctoral Fellowships Available
The Center for Host-Microbial Interactions in the Duke Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology has current openings in the Tri-Institutional Molecular Mycology Pathogenesis Training Program (MMPTP).  More …

Cullen Presents 2014 Raymond Schinazi Distinguished Lectureship
Bryan R. Cullen, PhD, James B. Duke Professor and Director of the Center for Virology in the Duke Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, gave the Raymond Schinazi Distinguished Lectureship at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia on October 15.  More …

Scientists Identify Gene Required for Recovery From Bacterial Infection
Duke researchers have uncovered the genes that are normally activated during recovery from bacterial infection in the C. elegans worm. The finding could be key to new antibiotics and countering auto-immune disorders.  More …

Stem-Cell Breakthrough in Treatment of Diabetes
Heitman lab alumnus, Felicia W. Pagliuca, PhD, has helped develop a procedure for making hundreds of millions of pancreatic beta cells in vitro.  More …

Prospecting for Malaria Drugs
Assistant Professor, Emily Derbyshire, PhD, works at the intersection of chemistry and biology to address malaria and other global health problems.  More …

Molecular Players in Brain Development, Aging
Assistant Professor, Dong Yan, PhD, is studying molecular pathways critical in development and aging.
More …

Goldstein to Head Institute for Genomic Medicine at Columbia University
David Goldstein, PhD, will be joining Columbia as Director of the University’s Institute for Genomic Medicine and Professor of Genetics and Development in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, effective January 1, 2015.  More …

Payne Receives ASM/CDC Resident Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Tamika Payne, a graduate student in the Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, has received the ASM/CDC Resident Postdoctoral Research Fellowship from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  More …

Ko Receives 2014 ICAAC Young Investigator Award
Dennis Ko, MD, PhD, an assistant professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, has received a 2014 ICAAC Young Investigator Award for his innovative and multidisciplinary research on the genetic basis for pathogen susceptibility in humans.  More …

AOA Medical Honor Society Members Named
Twice a year the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society elects a small number of new members. Membership in AOA is a distinction that accompanies a physician throughout his or her career.  More …

Fungus Deadly to AIDS Patients Found to Grow on Trees
Researchers have pinpointed the environmental source of fungal infections that have been sickening HIV/AIDS patients in Southern California for decades. It literally grows on trees.  More …

Garcia-Blanco Appointed Chair of Biochemistry and Microbiology at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston
Dr.  Mariano A. Garcia-Blanco has agreed to join UTMB as Chair of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. As Chair of BMB, Dr. Garcia-Blanco will lead efforts to further excellence in research, education, mentoring and scholarship that have broad fundamental, translational and clinical impact.  More …

Editing HPV’s Genes to Kill Cervical Cancer Cells
Researchers have hijacked a defense system normally used by bacteria to fend off viral infections and redirected it against the human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that causes cervical, head and neck, and other cancers.  More …

Gut Microbes Browse Along a Gene Buffet
In the moist, dark microbial rainforest of the intestine, hundreds of species of microorganisms interact with each other and with the cells of the host animal to get the resources they need to survive and thrive.  More …

Scientists Discover New Mechanism of Drug Resistance
Microorganisms like bacteria and fungi can evade treatment by acquiring mutations in the genes targeted by antibiotics or antifungal drugs.  More …

Macias Receives Dual Awards
Everardo Macias, PhD, was recently awarded a Prostate Cancer Foundation Young Investigator Award and an NIH Supplement to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research.  More …

Recalled Yogurt Contained Highly Pathogenic Mold
Samples isolated from recalled Chobani yogurt have been found to contain the most virulent form of a fungus called Mucor circinelloides.  More …

David Selected for Prestigious Sloan Research Award
Lawrence David, PhD, an assistant professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, has received a 2014 Sloan Research Fellowship, recognizing his work in computational and evolutionary molecular biology and identifying him as among the next generation of scientific leaders.  More …

Marchuk Awarded Distinguished Professorship
One Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology faculty member was awarded a distinguished professorship and recognized at a May 1 dinner at the Washington Duke Inn.  More …

Twelve MGM Trainees Receive Prestigious Fellowships/Honorable Mentions
Twelve MGM trainees have recently received prestigious fellowships/honorable mentions to support their research.  More …

Where DNA’s Copy Machine Pauses, Cancer Could Be Next
Each time a human cell divides, it must first make a copy of its 46 chromosomes to serve as an instruction manual for the new cell. Normally, this process goes off without a hitch. But from time to time, the information isn’t copied and collated properly, leaving gaps or breaks that the cell has to carefully combine back together.  More …

Deadly Human Pathogen Cryptococccus neoformans Fully Sequenced
Duke researchers have sequenced the entire genome and all the RNA products of the most important pathogenic lineage of Cryptococcus neoformans, a strain called H99.  More …

Modified Poliovirus Used as Therapy for Glioblastoma
Matthias Gromeier, MD, an associate professor of neurosurgery and molecular genetics and microbiology, has discovered that that the poliovirus could kill cancer cells while leaving healthy cells unharmed.  More …

Heitman Receives F1000Prime Faculty Member of the Year Award
Joseph Heitman, MD, PhD, James B. Duke Professor and Chair of the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology at Duke University, has received a 2013 F1000Prime Faculty Member of the Year Award.  More …

Valdivia Appointed Vice Dean of Basic Research
Raphael H. Valdivia, PhD, has been appointed the new vice dean for basic science for the Duke University School of Medicine, beginning July 1, 2014.  More …

MGM Summer Undergraduate Research Engagement (MGM SURE)
The Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology is pleased to announce a new 10-week summer fellowship program for Duke undergraduates. The program runs from June 2, 2014 – August 8, 2014.  More …

Four MGM Trainees Receive Prestigious Fellowships
Four MGM trainees, including Laura Simone Bisgono, Anthony Moore, Emily Snavely, and Barbara Sixt, have all recently received prestigious research support.  More …

Chi Receives Chancellor’s Discovery Award
Jen-Tsan Ashley Chi, MD, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology and Duke Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy at Duke University Medical Center, has received a Chancellor’s Discovery Award for his proposal entitled, “Dissect sexual differentiation in P. falciparum via single parasite analysis.”  More …

Permar Receives Young Investigator Award
Sallie R. Permar, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Infectious Diseases, Assistant Professor in Immunology, and Assistant Professor in Molecular Genetics and Microbiology at Duke University Medical Center, has received the Young Investigator Award from the Society for Pediatric Research (SPR).  More …

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